Research

A retrospective cohort study comparing pregnancy outcomes and neonatal characteristics between HIV-infected and HIV-non-infected mothers

G Goldman, S Budhram

Abstract


Background. South Africa (SA) has a high disease burden of HIV/AIDS. Previously, studies have shown that HIV-infected women have adverse pregnancy outcomes.

Objectives. To determine the effect of HIV infection on neonatal birthweight, head circumference, birth length and duration of pregnancy.

Methods. This was a retrospective study, and data were obtained from the maternity records of women who delivered at Stanger Hospital, SA, from August to December 2016. Pregnancies were dated using an early ultrasound scan. Women with comorbidities that are known to affect birth anthropometry were excluded, as well as all self-reported smokers. Women were divided into HIV-infected and HIV-non-infected groups and compared.

Results. Among the 392 women included in the cohort, 171 (43.6%) were HIV-infected and 221 (56.4%) were non-infected. All HIV-infected women were receiving antiretroviral therapy. There was no significant difference in neonatal birthweight, head circumference, birth length or duration of pregnancy between the groups.

Conclusions. HIV infection that has been treated does not appear to be an independent risk factor for fetal growth restriction or preterm delivery in an SA population.


Authors' affiliations

G Goldman, Discipline of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Clinical Medicine, College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa

S Budhram, Discipline of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Clinical Medicine, College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban; and Department of Maternal and Fetal Medicine, Inkosi Albert Luthuli Hospital, Durban, South Africa

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Keywords

Fetal growth; Birthweight; HIV; Head circumference; Birth length

Cite this article

South African Medical Journal 2020;110(6):502-504. DOI:10.7196/SAMJ.2020.v110i6.14357

Article History

Date submitted: 2020-05-29
Date published: 2020-05-29

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