Continuing Medical Education

Thrombotic disorders (part 1)

N A Alli, J Vaughan, S Louw, E Schapkaitz, B Jacobson

Abstract


Thromboembolic conditions are the leading cause of mortality, estimated to account for 1 in 4 deaths worldwide in 2010. Over time, the incidence and mortality rates of these conditions have improved in developed countries, but are increasing in developing countries. The haemostatic system comprises 6 main components, i.e. (i) platelets; (ii) vascular endothelium; (iii) coagulation proteins; (iv) natural anticoagulants; (v) the fibrinolytic system; and (vi) natural antifibrinolytic factors. A delicate balance exists between procoagulant and anticoagulant factors within the vascular system. Numerous acquired or inherited conditions may tip the balance either way, i.e. towards a prothrombotic or prohaemorrhagic state. In this issue of CME, the first of a 2-part series on thrombophilic disorders, the subject of discussion is on inherited varieties that the general practitioner is likely to encounter. This review is primarily based on venous thrombosis.


Authors' affiliations

N A Alli, Department of Molecular Medicine and Haematology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg; National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg, South Africa

J Vaughan, Department of Molecular Medicine and Haematology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg; National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg, South Africa

S Louw, Department of Molecular Medicine and Haematology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg; National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg, South Africa

E Schapkaitz, Department of Molecular Medicine and Haematology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg; National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg, South Africa

B Jacobson, Department of Molecular Medicine and Haematology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg; National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg, South Africa

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Keywords

Thrombophilia; Inherited; Pathophysiology; Diagnosis

Cite this article

South African Medical Journal 2020;110(2):83-87. DOI:10.7196/10.7196/SAMJ.2020.v110i2.14594

Article History

Date submitted: 2020-01-30
Date published: 2020-01-30

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